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RICHARD WOLECK

FRENCH POP ARTIST

"Woleck's current work leads him towards a disillusioned description of the Western world and its ideological or commercial motives. Close to "Pop Art" by the use of globalized images, it differs radically from it by the strength of its critical commitment "

WOLECK was born in 1960 in Nice. It was through music that he first got noticed. In 1978 he played with Barney Willem and met on this occasion Manu Katché who would become one of his best friends. In 1982 he created the group “Plein Sud” and recorded a few “hits”.

He put an end to this adventure in 1988 to create a screen printing business and practice his other passion: painting. In 1994 he returned to music and recorded an album with Peter Gabriel in Bath, England with Manu Katché as sound producer. In 1996 he opened for a David Bowie concert at the Parc des Princes in Paris. He will also play again in 2005 at the Cimiez arena in Nice, sharing the bill with, among others, Manu Katché and Jeff Beck. In between he finds time to continue his painting. Since 2007, thanks to the confidence of the Galerie Ferrero in Nice and the Galerie Menouar in Paris, he has devoted himself entirely to his activity as a visual artist. In a very short time, it acquired an already enviable recognition as evidenced by the purchases of many collectors from universes as varied as "people", industrial or medical circles. Woleck's current work leads him towards a disillusioned description of the Western world and its ideological or commercial motives. Close to "Pop Art" by the use of globalized images, it differs radically from it by the strength of its critical commitment. His “Superheroes” arrive too late and can only see their helplessness as soon as they come into contact with the real world. Its buildings are reflected in the form of the packaging of various anxiolytics, tranquilizers and other doping products without which their inhabitants cannot survive. When these same buildings are not erected quite simply as advertising placards, reducing any city to a gigantic commercial space.

On the architectures of the cities represented on the canvas is often superimposed another architecture, made of "plexiglass" blades of varying thicknesses. This added architecture, if it covers the others, does not double them identically. Autonomous in its structure and in its forms, it gives to the reading of the work an unstable relief according to the angle of the gaze which lands on it. “The painting” then becomes an object to be contemplated in itself, to be appreciated for its own plasticity, independently of the subject evoked.